Planning

Types of Disasters

Natural and human-induced diasters have severly affected the United States. South Carolina is prone to many of those types of disasters. Although disasters cannot be prevented, steps can be taken to minimize their negative impact on the citizens of Williamsburg County.

Hurricanes –

Before a Hurricane

  • Have a hurricane plan and ensure everyone in the household knows the plan.
  • Know your evacuation route.
  • Have an emergency supplies kit prepared, to include at least: three days’ drinking water (two quarts per person per day); non-perishable food; flashlight with extra batteries; portable battery-operated radio; first-aid kit; non-electric can opener; essential medicines; cash and credit cards.
  • Make arrangements for pets. Pets are not allowed in official shelters.
  • Protect your home by covering windows with permanent shutters, plywood panels or other shielding materials. Bring in lawn furniture and other loose objects, such as garbage cans, that may become a hazard during high winds.
  • Install straps or additional clips to securely fasten your roof to the frame structure. This will reduce roof damage.
  • Be sure trees and shrubs around your home are well-trimmed.
  • Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.
  • Determine how and where to secure your boat.
  • Fuel up and service family vehicles.

If a hurricane is likely in your area, you should:

  • Listen to the radio or watch TV for information.
  • Secure your home, close storm shutters, and secure outdoor objects or bring them indoors.
  • Turn off utilities if instructed to do so. Otherwise, turn the refrigerator thermostat to its coldest setting and keep its doors closed.
  • Turn off propane tanks.
  • Avoid using the phone, except for serious emergencies.
  • Ensure a supply of water for sanitary purposes such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Fill the bathtub and other large containers with water.

You should evacuate under the following conditions:

  • If you are directed by local authorities to do so. Be sure to follow their instructions.
  • If you live in a mobile home or temporary structure—such shelters are particularly hazardous during hurricanes no matter how well-fastened to the ground.
  • If you live in a high-rise building—hurricane winds are stronger at higher elevations.
  • If you live on the coast, on a floodplain, near a river, or on an inland waterway.
  • If you feel you are in danger.

During a Hurricane

If you are unable to evacuate, you should:

  • Stay indoors during the hurricane and away from windows and glass doors.
  • Close all interior doors-secure and brace external doors.
  • Keep curtains and blinds closed. Do not be fooled if there is a lull; it could be the eye of the storm – winds will pick up again.
  • Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway.
  • Lie on the floor under a table or another sturdy object.
  • Be alert. Tornadoes are frequently spawned during hurricanes.

After a Hurricane

  • Wait until an area is declared safe before re-entering.
  • Do not drive in flooded areas.
  • Avoid using candles or other open flames indoors. Use a flashlight to inspect damage.
  • Check gas, water, electrical lines and appliances for damage.
  • Avoid any loose or down power lines and report them to your power company.
  • Avoid drinking or preparing food with tap water until local officials have declared it safe to drink

Tornado-

Before a Tornado

  • Be alert to changing weather conditions.
  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or television newscasts for the latest information.
  • Look for approaching storms.
    • Look for the following danger signs:
    • Dark, often greenish sky
    • Large hail
    • A large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating)
    • Loud roar, similar to a freight train

If you see approaching storms or any of the danger signs, be prepared to take shelter immediately.

During a Tornado

If you are under a tornado warning, seek shelter immediately.

  • Get indoors to a pre-designated shelter area such as a basement, storm cellar or the lowest building level. If there is no basement, go to the center of an interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors and outside walls.
  • Shutter windows and outside doors.
  • If in a vehicle, trailer or mobile home, get out immediately and go to the lowest floor of a sturdy, nearby building or storm shelter.
  • If unable to get indoors, lie flat in a nearby ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands. Be aware of potential flooding and flying debris.
  • Never try to outrun a tornado in your vehicle. Instead, leave the vehicle immediately for safe shelter.

After a Tornado

  • Use the telephone only for emergency calls.
  • Avoid downed power lines and report them to your utility company.
  • Stay out of damaged buildings

Floods

Before a Flood

  • Avoid building in a floodprone area unless you elevate and reinforce your home.
  • Elevate the furnace, water heater and electric panel if susceptible to flooding.
  • Install check valves in sewer traps to prevent floodwater from backing up into the drains of your home.
  • Contact community officials to find out if they are planning to construct barriers (levees, berms or floodwalls) to stop floodwater from entering the homes in your area.
  • Seal the walls in your basement with waterproofing compounds to avoid seepage.
  • Review your insurance policy. Flood coverage is not part of most homeowner, mobile home or renter’s insurance policies. There is a 30-day waiting period for coverage to take effect.

During a Flood

  • Be aware of potential flash flooding. If there is any possibility of a flash flood, move to higher ground. Do not wait to be told to move.
  • If time allows, prepare your home for a flood by moving essential items to an upper floor, bring in outdoor furniture, disconnect electrical appliances and be prepared to turn off the gas, electricity and water.
  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall. If you have to walk in water, walk where the water is not moving. Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle could be quickly swept away.

After a Flood

  • After a flood, listen for news reports to learn whether the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline or raw sewage. Water may also be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines.
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Even if the roadway of a bridge or elevated highway looks normal, the support structures below may be damaged.
  • Stay clear of downed power lines and report them to your power company.
  • Use extreme caution when entering buildings; there may be hidden damage, particularly to foundations. Stay out of any building that is surrounded by floodwaters.
  • Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and other harmful chemicals.

Earthquake

Before an Earthquake

Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently and without warning. Identifying potential hazards ahead of time and advance planning can reduce the dangers of serious injury or loss of life from an earthquake. Repairing deep plaster cracks in ceilings and foundations, anchoring overhead lighting fixtures to the ceiling and following local seismic building standards will help reduce the impact of earthquakes.

Six Ways to Plan Ahead

1.  Check for Hazards in the Home

  • Fasten shelves securely to walls.
  • Place large or heavy objects on lower shelves.
  • Store breakable items such as bottled foods, glass and china in low, closed cabinets with latches.
  • Hang heavy items such as pictures and mirrors away from beds, couches and anywhere people sit.
  • Brace overhead light fixtures.
  • Repair defective electrical wiring and leaky gas connections. These are potential fire risks.
  • Secure water heaters by strapping them to the wall studs and bolting them to the floor.
  • Repair any deep cracks in ceilings or foundations. Get expert advice if there are signs of structural defects.
  • Store weed killers, pesticides and flammable products securely in closed cabinets with latches and on bottom shelves.

2.  Identify Safe Places Indoors and Outdoors

  • Under sturdy furniture, such as heavy desks or tables;
  • Against inside walls;
  • Away from where glass could shatter around windows, mirrors or pictures and where heavy bookcases or other heavy furniture could fall; and
  • In the open, away from buildings, trees, telephone and electrical lines, overpasses or elevated expressways.

3.  Educate Yourself and Family Members

  • Practice “Drop, Cover, and Hold On” drills;
  • Teach children how and when to dial 9-1-1, police or fire departments and which radio stations broadcast emergency information; and
  • Teach all family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity and water.

4.  Have Disaster Supplies on Hand

  • Flashlight and extra batteries.
  • Portable battery-operated radio and extra batteries.
  • First-aid kit and manual.
  • Emergency food and water.
  • Non-electric can opener.
  • Essential medicines.
  • Cash and credit cards.
  • Sturdy shoes.

5.  Develop an Emergency Communication Plan

  • In case family members are separated from one another during an earthquake (a real possibility during the day when adults are at work and children are at school), develop a plan for reuniting after the disaster.
  • Ask an out-of-state relative or friend to serve as the “family contact.” After a disaster, it’s often easier to call long-distance. Make sure everyone in the family knows the name, address and phone number of the contact person.

6.  Help Your Community Get Ready

  • Publish a special section in your local newspaper with emergency information on earthquakes. Localize the information by printing the phone numbers of local emergency services offices, the American Red Cross and hospitals.
  • Conduct a week-long series on locating hazards in the home.
  • Work with local emergency services and American Red Cross officials to prepare special reports for people with functional needs on what to do during an earthquake.
  • Provide tips on conducting earthquake drills in the home.
  • Interview representatives of the gas, electric and water companies about shutting off utilities.
  • Work together in your community to apply your knowledge to building codes, retrofitting programs, hazard hunts and neighborhood and family emergency plans.

During an Earthquake

Be aware that some earthquakes are actually foreshocks and a larger earthquake might occur. Minimize your movements to a few steps to a nearby safe place and if you are indoors, stay there until the shaking has stopped and you are sure exiting is safe.

If indoors:

  • DROP to the ground; take COVER by getting under a sturdy table or other piece of furniture; and HOLD ON until the shaking stops. If there isn’t a table or desk near you, cover your face and head with your arms and crouch in an inside corner of the building.
  • Stay away from glass, windows, outside doors and walls and anything that could fall, such as lighting fixtures or furniture.
  • Stay in bed if you are there when the earthquake strikes. Hold on and protect your head with a pillow, unless you are under a heavy light fixture that could fall. In that case, move to the nearest safe place.
  • Use a doorway for shelter only if it is in close proximity to you and if you know it is a strongly supported, load-bearing doorway.
  • Stay inside until the shaking stops and it is safe to go outside. Research has shown that most injuries occur when people inside buildings attempt to move to a different location inside the building or try to leave.
  • Be aware that the electricity may go out or the sprinkler systems or fire alarms may turn on.
  • DO NOT use the elevators.

If outdoors:

  • Stay there.
  • Move away from buildings, streetlights and utility wires.
  • Once in the open, stay there until the shaking stops. The greatest danger exists directly outside buildings, at exits and alongside exterior walls.
  • Ground movement during an earthquake is seldom the direct cause of death or injury. Most earthquake-related casualties result from collapsing walls, flying glass and falling objects.

If in a moving vehicle:

  • Stop as quickly as safety permits and stay in the vehicle. Avoid stopping near or under buildings, trees, overpasses and utility wires.
  • Proceed cautiously once the earthquake has stopped. Avoid roads, bridges or ramps that might have been damaged by the earthquake.

If trapped under debris:

  • Do not light a match.
  • Do not move about or kick up dust.
  • Cover your mouth with a handkerchief or clothing.
  • Tap on a pipe or wall so rescuers can locate you. Use a whistle if one is available. Shout only as a last resort. Shouting can cause you to inhale dangerous amounts of dust.

After an Earthquake

  • Expect aftershocks. These secondary shockwaves are usually less violent than the main quake, but can be strong enough to do additional damage to weakened structures and can occur in the first hours, days, weeks or even months after the quake.
  • Listen to a battery-operated radio or television. Listen for the latest emergency information.
  • Use the telephone only for emergency calls.
  • Open cabinets cautiously. Beware of objects that can fall off shelves.
  • Stay away from damaged areas. Stay away unless your assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire or relief organizations. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.
  • Be aware of possible tsunamis if you live in coastal areas. These are also known as seismic sea waves (mistakenly called “tidal waves”). When local authorities issue a tsunami warning, assume that a series of dangerous waves is on the way. Stay away from the beach.
  • Help injured or trapped persons. Remember to help your neighbors who may require special assistance such as infants, the elderly and people with disabilities. Give first aid where appropriate. Do not move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of further injury. Call for help.
  • Clean up spilled medicines, bleaches, gasoline or other flammable liquids immediately. Leave the area if you smell gas or fumes from other chemicals.
  • Inspect the entire length of chimneys for damage. Unnoticed damage could lead to a fire.
  • Inspect utilities.
    • Check for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear blowing or hissing noise, open a window and quickly leave the building. Turn off the gas at the outside main valve if you can and call the gas company from a neighbor’s home. If you turn off the gas for any reason, it must be turned back on by a professional.
    • Look for electrical system damage. If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires or if you smell hot insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. If you have to step in water to get to the fuse box or circuit breaker, call an electrician first for advice.
    • Check for sewage and water lines damage. If you suspect sewage lines are damaged, avoid using the toilets and call a plumber. If water pipes are damaged, contact the water company and avoid using water from the tap. You can obtain safe water by melting ice cubes.

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Before a Fire

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your residence.
  • Place smoke alarms outside bedrooms on the ceiling or high on the wall (4 to 12 inches from ceiling), at the top of open stairways, or at the bottom of enclosed stairs and near (but not in) the kitchen.
  • Test and clean smoke alarms once a month and replace batteries at least once a year.
  • Review escape routes with your family and where to meet outside of the house. Practice escaping from each room in the house.
  • Consider escape ladders if your residence has more than one level.
  • Teach family members to stay low on the floor (where the air is safer in a fire) when escaping from a fire.
  • Store flammable liquids in approved containers in well-ventilated storage areas. Do not smoke near flammable liquids.
  • Sleep with your door closed.
  • Install fire A-B-C type fire extinguishers in your residence and teach family members how to use them.

During a Fire

  • If escaping from a fire, check closed doors for heat before you open them with the back of your hand. Do not open a hot door; escape through a window. If you cannot escape, hang a white or light-colored sheet outside the window to alert emergency responders to your presence.
  • If your clothes catch on fire, you should Stop, Drop, and Roll until the fire is extinguished. Running will only make the fire burn faster.
  • Close doors behind you as you escape to delay the spread of the fire.

After a Fire

  • If you are with burn victims, or are a burn victim yourself, call 9-1-1; cool and cover burns to reduce chance of further injury or infection.
  • If you detect heat or smoke when entering a damaged building, evacuate immediately.
  • If you are a tenant, contact the landlord.
  • If you have a safe or strong box, do not try to open it. It can hold intense heat for several hours. If the door is opened before the box has cooled, the contents could burst into flames.
  • If you must leave your home because a building inspector says the building is unsafe, ask someone you trust to watch the property during your absence.

Dam Failures

Before a Dam Failure

  • Know your risk. There are more than 50,000 dams located throughout South Carolina. Do you live downstream from a dam? Is the dam a high-hazard or significant-hazard potential dam?
  • Review the current Emergency Action Plan (EAP) for the dam. An EAP is a formal document required for all dams regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), the US Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), or designated as a “High Hazard” or “Significant Hazard” by the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC). Dams designated as “Low Hazard” by DHEC are surveyed every three years. The EAPs are developed and maintained by the dam owners, identify potential emergency conditions at a dam, and specify pre-planned actions to be followed to reduce property damage and loss of life. Please contact the dam owner if you have any questions concerning the EAP for a specific dam.
  • Know your evacuation route should you be told to evacuate.
  • Review your insurance policy. Flood coverage is not part of most homeowner, mobile home or renter’s insurance policies. There is a 30-day waiting period for coverage to take effect.

During a Dam Failure

  • If told to evacuate, secure your home. If you have time, bring in outdoor furniture and move essential items to an upper floor.
  • Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves, if instructed to do so. Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall. If you have to walk in water, walk where the water is not moving. Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be quickly swept away.

After a Dam Failure

  • After a flood, listen for news reports to learn whether the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage. Water may also be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines.
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Even if the roadway of a bridge or elevated highway looks normal, the support structures below may be damaged.
  • Stay clear of downed power lines and report them to your power company.
  • Use extreme caution when entering buildings; there may be hidden damage, particularly to foundations. Stay out of any building that is surrounded by floodwaters.
  • Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and other harmful chemicals.

Thunderstorm

Before a Thunderstorm

  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or television newscasts for the latest information.
  • Remove dead or rotting trees and branches that could fall and cause injury or damage. Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.
  • “If thunder roars, go indoors.” No place outside is safe when lightning is in the area.

During a Thunderstorm

  • Shutter windows and secure outside doors. If shutters are not available, close window blinds, shades or curtains.
  • If unable to get indoors, seek shelter in a low area and be alert for flash flooding and flying debris.
  • Avoid isolated sheds or other small structures in open areas. Avoid anything metal: tractors, farm equipment, motorcycles and golf carts.
  • If on open water, get to land and find shelter immediately.
  • Your hair standing on end is an indication that lightning is about to strike. If this happens, squat low to the ground on the balls of your feet. Place your hands over your ears and your head between your knees. Make yourself the smallest target possible and minimize your contact with the ground. Do not lie flat on the ground.

After a Thunderstorm

The following are things you should check when you attempt to give aid to a victim of lightning:

  • Breathing – if breathing has stopped, begin mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
  • Heartbeat – if the heart has stopped, administer CPR.
  • Pulse – if the victim has a pulse and is breathing, look for other possible injuries. Check for burns where the lightning entered and left the body. Also, be alert for nervous system damage, broken bones and loss of hearing and eyesight.

Severe Winter Weather

Winter Weather: Know the Terms

  • Winter Storm Watch: A winter storm is possible in your area. Tune in to your NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio or television for more information.
  • Winter Storm Warning: A winter storm is occurring or will soon occur in your area.
  • Freezing Rain: Rain that freezes when it hits the ground, creating a coating of ice on roads, walkways, trees and power lines.
  • Sleet: Rain that turns to ice pellets before reaching the ground. Sleet also causes moisture on roads to freeze and become slippery.
  • Frost/Freeze Warning: Below freezing temperatures are expected.

Before a Winter Storm

  • Add winter supplies like rock salt to melt ice and shovels to your disaster supply kit.
  • Prepare for possible isolation in your home by having sufficient heating fuel; regular fuel sources may be cut off.
  • Insulate pipes with insulation or newspapers and plastic and allow faucets to drip a little during cold weather to avoid freezing.
  • Learn how to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts.
  • Have your vehicle serviced to ensure it is prepared for the winter season.
  • Place a winter emergency kit in every vehicle that includes: a shovel; windshield scraper and small broom; flashlight; battery-powered radio; extra batteries; water; snack food; matches; extra hats, socks and mittens; first aid kit with pocket knife; necessary medications; blankets; tow chain or rope; road salt and sand; booster cables; emergency flares; fluorescent distress flag.

During a Winter Storm

    • Stay indoors. If you must go outside, dress in layers of loose fitting, lightweight clothing. Wear a hat that covers your ears. Wear mittens and cover your mouth with a scarf to protect your lungs. Wear waterproof, insulated boots to keep your feet warm and dry and to maintain your footing in ice and snow.
    • Avoid overexertion when shoveling snow. Overexertion can bring on a heart attack—a major cause of death in the winter. If you must shovel snow, stretch before going outside.
    • Keep dry. Change wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. Wet clothing loses all of its insulating value and transmits heat rapidly.

Watch for signs of frostbite such as the loss of feeling and white or pale appearance in extremities such as finger, toes, ear lobes and the tip of your nose.

  • Drive only if it is absolutely necessary. If you must drive, travel in the day, don’t travel alone and keep others informed of your schedule. Decrease your speed and leave plenty of room to stop the vehicle on icy roads.
  • If trapped in your car during a blizzard, pull off of the highway and turn on your hazard lights. Remain in your vehicle where rescuers are most likely to find you. Run the engine and heater about 10 minutes each hour to keep warm. When the engine is running, open a downwind window slightly for ventilation and periodically clear snow from the exhaust pipe. This will protect you from possible carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Exercise to maintain body heat, but avoid overexertion. Drink fluids to avoid dehydration.

 

After a Winter Storm

  • Listen to your local radio or television station for the latest weather and traffic reports.
  • Go to a designated shelter if your home loses power or heat during periods of extreme cold.
  • Check on your animals and ensure that their access to food and water is not blocked by snow drifts, ice or other obstacles. Bring them indoors, if possible.
  • Be aware of possible carbon monoxide poisoning, electric shock and fire if using alternative sources for electricity, heating or cooking.

Wild Fires

Before a Wildfire

If you see a wildfire, call 9-1-1. Don’t assume that someone else has already called. Describe the location of the fire, speak slowly and clearly, and answer any questions asked by the dispatcher.

Before the Fire Approaches Your House

  • Evacuate. Evacuate your pets and all family members who are not essential to preparing the home. Anyone with medical or physical limitations and the young and the elderly should be evacuated immediately.
  • Wear protective clothing.
  • Remove combustibles. Clear items that will burn from around the house: wood piles, lawn furniture, barbecue grills, tarp coverings, etc. Move them outside of your defensible space.
  • Close/protect openings. Close outside attic, eaves and basement vents, windows, doors, pet doors, etc. Remove flammable drapes and curtains. Close all shutters, blinds or heavy non-combustible window coverings to reduce radiant heat.
  • Close inside doors/open damper. Close alt doors inside the house to prevent draft. Open the damper on your fireplace, but close the fireplace screen.
  • Shut off gas. Shut off any natural gas, propane or fuel oil supplies at the source.
  • Water. Connect garden hoses. Fill any pools, hot tubs, garbage cans, tubs or other large containers with water.
  • Pumps. If you have gas-powered pumps for water, make sure they are fueled and ready.
  • Ladder. Place a ladder against the house in clear view.
  • Car. Back your car into the driveway and roll up the windows.
  • Garage doors. Disconnect any automatic garage door openers so that doors can still be opened by hand if the power goes out. Close all garage doors.
  • Valuables. Place valuable papers, mementos and anything “you can’t live without” inside the car in the garage, ready for quick departure. Any pets still with you should also be put in the car.

Preparing to Leave

  • Lights. Turn on outside lights and leave a light on in every room to make the house more visible in heavy smoke.
  • Don’t lock up. Leave doors and windows closed but unlocked. It may be necessary for firefighters to gain quick entry into your home to fight fire. The entire area will be isolated and patrolled by sheriff’s deputies or police.

During a Wildfire

Survival in a Vehicle

  • This is dangerous and should only be done in an emergency, but you can survive the firestorm if you stay in your car. It is much less dangerous than trying to run from a fire on foot.
  • Roll up windows and close air vents. Drive slowly with headlights on. Watch for other vehicles and pedestrians. Do not drive through heavy smoke.
  • If you have to stop, park away from the heaviest trees and brush. Turn headlights on and ignition off. Roll up windows and close air vents.
  • Get on the floor and cover up with a blanket or coat.
  • Stay in the vehicle until the main fire passes.
  • Stay in the vehicle. Do not run! The engine may stall and not restart. Air currents may rock the car. Some smoke and sparks may enter the vehicle and the temperature inside will increase. Metal gas tanks and containers rarely explode.

If You Are Trapped at Home

  • If you do find yourself trapped by wildfire inside your home, stay inside and away from outside walls. Close doors, but leave them unlocked. Keep your entire family together and remain calm.

If Caught in the Open

  • The best temporary shelter is in a sparse fuel area. On a steep mountainside, the back side is safer. Avoid canyons, natural “chimneys” and saddles.
  • If a road is nearby, lie face down along the road cut or in the ditch on the uphill side. Cover yourself with anything that will shield you from the fire’s heat.
  • If hiking in the back country, seek a depression with sparse fuel. Clear fuel away from the area while the fire is approaching and then lie face down in the depression and cover yourself. Stay down until after the fire passes!

After a Wildfire

  • Check the roof immediately. Put out any roof fires, sparks or embers. Check the attic for hidden burning sparks.
  • If you have a fire, get your neighbours to help fight it.
  • The water you put into your pool or hot tub and other containers will come in handy now. If the power is out, try connecting a hose to the outlet on your water heater.
  • For several hours after the fire, maintain a “fire watch.” Re-check for smoke and sparks throughout the house.

Are you Ready!

Emergency/Non Emergency Telephone Numbers
Emergency Management Office-843-354-9330
Emergency Operation Center (only operatonal during disaster)-843-354-0775, 843-354-0791, 843-354-0795, 843-354-0800, 843-354-0803, 843-354-0804

Evacuation-

Williamsburg County Shelters-
Kingstree Middle School- 616 Martin Luther King Jr. Hwy, Kingstree, SC 29556
Kingstree Senior High School-615 Martin Luther King Jr. Hwy, Kingstree, SC 29556
Kingstree -710 Third Avenue, Kingstree, SC 29556
Heminway High School-402 S Main St., Hemingway, SC 29554
C.E. Murray High School-222 C.E. Murray Blvd., Greeleyville, SC 29056
D.P Cooper Charter School-4568 Seaboard Rd., Salters, SC 29560

Williamsburg County Evacuation Routes

evacuation map

89-1 US 52 at US 521 (Greeleyville Crossroads)
89-2 US 52 at SC 375
89-3 US 521 and SC 377
89-4 US 41 at SC 51
89-5 US 261 at S-24
89-6 SC 41 at SC 527
89-7 SC 261 at SC 41
89-8 US 521 at SC 375

Family Disaster Planning

See: www.ready.gov